Report says medical devices may result in nerve injuries

On behalf of David Bowling of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation posted in Brain Injuries on Wednesday, November 28, 2018. Medical technology has made significant improvements and changes in the lives of individuals in Louisiana and all across the world. According to the Food and Drug Administration, there are approximately 190,000 medical devices currently on the market that are approved for physician and patient use. The industry for medical devices has grown rapidly resulting in a $400 billion dollar industry. Despite the multitude of devices available, some people are questioning the safety of devices approved and the FDA approval process. One man in another state reports his personal experience with a medical device and the nerve injuries

2019-11-08T10:59:21+00:00November 28th, 2018|

Woman accuses hospital of emergency room malpractice

On behalf of David Bowling of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation posted in Hospital Negligence on Tuesday, November 20, 2018. All orders in a hospital are important, but some can mean the difference between life or death for a patient. The wrong dose of medicine, the wrong medicine, the wrong operation or the error of a physician can result in serious injury or death of a patient. Louisiana patients may be interested in one woman's lawsuit, claiming that she suffered because of emergency room malpractice. Although she did not die, she now claims she has suffered additional medical expenses and pain as a result of two different medical errors during her care at a hospital in another

2019-11-08T10:57:57+00:00November 20th, 2018|

Preventing Hospital Infections

By Zach Christiansen of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation on Tuesday, November 20, 2018. NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana. Whenever patients enter a healthcare setting, they run the risk of being exposed to infections and even to superbugs (antibiotic and drug-resistant bacteria). Hospitals have a responsibility to take steps to prevent the transmission of illness for people who are in these settings. According to the Centers for Disease Control, hospitals are advised to perform hand hygiene, to use personal protective equipment, and to prevent the spread of infections through catheters, needles, and ventilators. Hospitals must take steps to prevent infections during surgery and in injection sites. Long-term care facilities are also areas where the risk of infection can be

2019-11-08T10:58:24+00:00November 20th, 2018|

Can Parents Sue Colleges for Students’ Wrongful Death?

By Zach Christiansen of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation on Tuesday, November 20, 2018. BATON ROUGE, Louisiana. The media has recently raised awareness of suicide on college campuses. Many students report suffering from depression and anxiety, especially during their first years in college. A new environment, new pressures, and new challenges can make symptoms worse. When any young person kills him or herself, family, friends, and communities often wonder whether anything could have been done to prevent it. Some parents, however, believe that their children's colleges have a responsibility to do a better job at preventing student suicides. According to the Daily Pennsylvanian, one mother is suing Penn for her son's suicide, alleging that the school and

2019-11-08T11:04:17+00:00November 20th, 2018|

Louisiana Ranked Second in Poor Maternal Care

By Zach Christiansen of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation on Monday, November 19, 2018. The Bowling Law Firm recently published a blog article about a USA TODAY investigation into maternal care and why the United States has been deemed the most dangerous country in which to give birth in the developed world. Now, Tulane University has announced it is conducting a study into maternal care in Louisiana. As explained in an article published in the New Orleans Advocate on November 6, 2018, the Tulane study will be conducted by Maeve Wallace of the University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. The study will utilize $2.4 million in grants to fund the research into pregnancy-associated mortality. This

2019-11-08T11:03:45+00:00November 19th, 2018|

When Medical Scribes Make Mistakes

By Zach Christiansen of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation on Tuesday, November 13, 2018. JACKSON, Mississippi. As doctors spend more and more time on their computers writing up patient records, some doctors have chosen to outsource their note taking to medical scribes. Medical scribes are generally not doctors. They are often paid minimum wage (or just slightly above minimum wage) to take doctor's notes. According to the New Yorker, medical scribes are essentially glorified note-takers, and their rates of error can be as high 50 percent, according to one study. When medical scribes make mistakes, and when doctors rely on patient's records drawn up by medical scribes to make diagnostic decisions, medical malpractice can occur. In some

2019-11-08T10:58:55+00:00November 13th, 2018|

Chris Cornell’s family accuses doctor of medical malpractice

On behalf of David Bowling of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation posted in Hospital Negligence on Tuesday, November 13, 2018. Many Louisiana residents are likely aware that pharmaceutical drugs are all classified in different ways. Many drugs are controlled to help prevent overdosing and abuse of the drugs, requiring strict prescribing rules. Following 52-year-old Chris Cornell's death in 2017, his family filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against his physician for negligently prescribing controlled drugs to the singer. In 2017, Chris Cornell's family received the shocking news that he had taken his own life. Following an investigation and toxicology reports, controlled substances were found in his system, including a drug called Ativan. Although Cornell had a history of addiction

2019-11-07T13:06:34+00:00November 13th, 2018|

Are Computers Distracting Doctors?

By Zach Christiansen of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation on Tuesday, November 13, 2018. NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana. A recent New Yorker article indicates that doctors spend an estimated two hours on the computer for every hour they spend with patients. While we might have been sold on the idea that computers would change medicine for the better, some are starting to wonder whether computers are more of a distraction than anything else. In fact, according to a doctor writing for the New Yorker, doctors may spend as much as half their time in the examination room looking at their computers rather than looking at patients. This means that there's less time for doctors to listen to their

2019-11-08T19:07:56+00:00November 13th, 2018|

Is medical malpractice to blame for famous musician’s death?

On behalf of David Bowling of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation posted in Medical Malpractice on Wednesday, November 7, 2018. As Louisiana readers may know, the lead singer for the band Soundgarden, Chris Cornell, was found dead in his hotel room after an apparent suicide. The death took place months ago, and now his widow is moving forward with a medical malpractice claim against the doctor that prescribed him certain types of medication. Cornell had a medical history that includes addiction and relapses. According to the claim filed by the grieving widow, the doctor should have known that the drug prescribed could have caused him harm, and he allegedly failed to warn Cornell about it potentially causing

2019-11-07T13:07:20+00:00November 7th, 2018|

Minimally-Invasive Surgery for Cervical Cancer Could Lead to Reoccurrence

JACKSON, Mississippi. The New York Times recently reported on a study published by the New England Journal of Medicine that found that minimally-invasive surgery for cervical cancer comes with a higher risk of reoccurrence than the older, more invasive method. In fact, partway through the study, the study had to be halted because too many women who were receiving the minimally invasive procedure were dying. Doctors could not continue the research ethically, without informing patients about the risk. Doctors in the study stopped it to tell patients who were considering the minimally invasive surgery to go with open surgery instead. As more cancer specialists learn about the new data, many are changing the way they treat cancer surgically. While less-invasive

2019-11-07T11:44:57+00:00November 5th, 2018|