Inaccurate electronic medical records and doctor errors

On behalf of David Bowling of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation posted in Hospital Negligence on Friday, November 21, 2014. Doctor's offices, hospitals and other health care providers in Louisiana are adapting to the government-imposed transition from traditional paper systems for maintaining patient records to electronic medical records. A recent study has uncovered evidence of mistakes and omissions in electronic records that is causing concern among medical professionals. Investigators reviewing the electronic records of patients following surgery found that only about one-third of the patient charts were free of mistakes or omissions. According to medical professionals who are familiar with electronic record systems, the cause is that the accuracy of the data in the systems depends upon

2019-11-08T10:10:20+00:00November 21st, 2014|

Medication errors: how they occur, and how they can affect you

On behalf of David Bowling of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation posted in Medical Malpractice on Tuesday, November 11, 2014. It can be tempting to think of medical malpractice in terms of mistakes made in hospital settings during significant medical procedures such as surgeries. However, while doctor errors such as perforating an organ with a surgical instrument or a mistake in administering anesthesia are real examples of how you can suffer an injury in a health care environment, another common form of medical malpractice can occur outside of the hospital, and even when you are at home: medication errors. Anyone who suffers harm such as a worsened medical condition or overdose arising from a mistake involving prescription

2019-11-08T10:10:09+00:00November 11th, 2014|

Wrong site surgery: how it can happen, and its effects

On behalf of David Bowling of The Bowling Law Firm, A Professional Law Corporation posted in Medical Malpractice on Thursday, November 6, 2014. The phenomenon of surgical errors that involve mistakes such as leaving a surgical instrument inside a patient's body, or accidentally injuring an organ during surgery, is well known among medical and legal professionals as well as many people in the general public. This is easy to understand, as a surgical mistake such as leaving a clamp in a patient is often sensational enough to make the news. There is another kind of error that can happen in surgery that is perhaps even more striking when it occurs, but which may not be as generally well known: a

2019-11-08T10:10:43+00:00November 6th, 2014|